Oregon Dreaming

One of my favorite places to vacation is the Oregon Coast. Since the coast of Oregon is entirely park, there are a lot of great spots to visit and explore, and for artists, there is an endless amount of inspiration. I found this shot on file from the summer of 2013. A silvery kind of picture with lots of mid-tones, this misty shot is one of the reasons I love the coast so much. Depth can be conveyed so easily. You can really bring something out in your foreground when just 50 fifty feet away, objects become slightly obscured by the atmospheric conditions of places like this.

OregonCoast

Thanks for stopping by,

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

Pizza, Pumpkins, and Pagels

On one of the most beautiful October days in memory, my family and I made our way down to Gordon Skagit Farms. They had everything you would want in a pumpkin patch. They had a corn maze, fresh apple cider, plenty of pre-picked gourds in all shapes and sizes, and of course a great big field of pumpkins. I was originally hoping for a nice overcast day to capture the color of the fields, but It was so gorgeous I really didn’t mind.

Taken at a pumpkin patch  west of Mt. Vernon Washington.
Taken at a pumpkin patch west of Mt. Vernon Washington.

Couldn’t resist this colorful still-life.

OctoberBounty

..and as always, some black and white conversions (see older post for tutorial)

Patch2

…and one more:

Plenty

Thanks for stopping by,

Shawn Pagels

(ArtSEEguy)

Changing perspective

Last Friday, I had a small window of time to get out to one of my favorite lakeside beaches before the sun went completely down. Desperately setting up my tripod and attaching lenses, I managed to get a few shots before the sky became completely dark. Out of a dozen pictures I shot, These two are the strongest, and as I was sharpening them in photoshop, I realized the driftwood in both pictures are the same. When pressured by time and the weather I simply look through my view finder and find the best picture possible and am not concerned with using the same objects in multiple pictures. In fact, this is a great lesson in self editing and honing your objective eye.

Putting It Out There:

DSC_0472

DSC_0473WEB

If you fall in love with something you are photographing, remember; the subject doesn’t hold the image together. Find a way to make your pictures really work by trying different angles, placement of the object, exposure settings, and all those other tricks you’ve been learning on your photography journey.

Please contact me with questions, and don’t forget to follow me to get more photographic tips and inspiration.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

River Ghost

Here is a photograph I took near Maple Falls, Washington. There is something about large birds I find compelling and mysterious. After getting about knee deep in smelly river mud, I was able to get just close enough to frame this shot.

heronburn_by_starbirdsky-d75oe4v

Thanks for stopping by.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

Time to Rock!

No tutorial today, but please enjoy a few rock photographs!

CRACK!:

crack__by_starbirdsky-d6j6v90

Left Overs:

left_overs_by_starbirdsky-d76cfos

Rock Hut:

rock_hut_by_starbirdsky-d6ifz62

Sand Castles:

sand_castles_by_starbirdsky-d6j6wih

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

It’s All A Fog

Use fog and misty conditions to create photos with depth and moodiness. In understanding that objects closer to the camera will be darker, tonality, or darkness and lightness, can be exploited to make highly expressive photographs.

Sea mist aided in the creation of space in this black and white coastal shot.

mistysquare_by_starbirdsky-d6j5z04

In this cliff side photograph, the fog helps define the form of the rock walls and directs the eye to the closer, more detailed surfaces..

around_clark_s_point_by_starbirdsky-d6lscqb

In this minimalist photograph, the foggy conditions were crucial in separating out the few elements that were in the composition. This was an exercise in the less-is-more approach to picture making.

silver_spirit_by_starbirdsky-d6mhty6

For the most part, fog and misty conditions are a photographers friend. Remember to take a tripod along for those darker days. Let those hazy conditions prime your imagination!

As always, contact me with questions, pointers, article requests, or just to say ,”You’re awesome!”

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

 

Divide and Conquer

Often times you are presented with a subject that has no discerning background or with a landscape that has a clear division between two parts. Understanding the relationship your subject has with the  negative spaces and applying a clear use of dominance can mean the difference between your pictures looking okay and looking outstanding.

Figure Ground:

After adjusting the image with some curves in photoshop to completely whiten the background, I cropped in a little closer to provide interesting shapes  in the negative space. This also gave the rock dominance by allowing it to occupy more space than the background.

earth_and_sky_by_starbirdsky-d7w1ban

With two main sections in this image, I had to decide between the two which would dominate. Visually it made more sense to allow the dark water to rule. The flow of the composition moves from left to right smoother and it also places my bird in a pleasing space.

lookingbacksm_by_starbirdsky-d7w1b4s

It seems to me that shooting photography down a shoreline always presents opportunity for dominance choices. Should I let the land dominate, or the water? The answer isn’t always clear and many times, both options work. Here, I chose the land. This is a case when both would have worked with a little moving around on my part.

same_as_before_by_starbirdsky-d789bbr

Now, go forth and conquer your next photography quest! As always, feel free to comment, ask questions, or request a subject for a post.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

Some Words On Thirds…and a few birds. (the revised, less wordy version)

Besides being a great number in a still-life, Three is a good rule-of-thumb number when arranging and composing your photograph. An overly symmetric image can look too static. This, of course, is frequently used for an iconic effect. However, in this post I want to demonstrate how to set up a picture in thirds, creating drama and a dynamic viewing experience. The following are examples on how that can be achieved:

This group of birds forms a band that’s about a third the length of the photograph. The water and other darker landforms help visually to form this division.

Catch A BreezeWeb

The extending tree limb this heron is perched on is roughly one third the way up from the bottom, while the head and highlight on the wing are about a third the way from the right. Normally I avoid directing eyes out of the picture, but the tree limb helps counter an unwanted symmetry that occurs from the whole of the bird visually dividing the image in half.

heronheron_by_starbirdsky-d75oefo

I’ve included this next example because it covers another rule of three repeated often in the world of landscape painting and photography: Foreground, middle-ground and background. The key elements in this image are the organic shaped form in the foreground, the dark land mass behind it and the tiny dark land mass at the extreme right of the image.

knot_head_by_starbirdsky-d76cfbh

There is a clear left dominance in this image with the form in the foreground clustered with the land mass on the left (not unlike a still-life composition where an apple might be grouped with a glass or bottle.) In an otherwise sparse scene, these uses of thirds, as well as the application of dominant and subordinate themes, can make your pictures become more dynamic and engaging.

I hope you find this tutorial helpful. Please contact me if you would like other tips or just want to say hi!

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

Finding A Path

When other compositional ideas are not working, find a way to direct the eye by including a path in your photograph.

Here is a shot I took on a neighborhood trail. A clear path takes the viewer up through the image and through the natural tunnel. O f course, you will not always have such a clear path to incorporate in your photograph.

fear_by_starbirdsky-d77x6cs

Sometimes, you have to really hun for these paths. In the case of this next picture I took on the Oregon coast, I found the water path first and then moved around to direct it somewhere interesting in my image.

introrockweb_by_starbirdsky-d6hqj6d

Here is a similar example I took on a snowy day. In on otherwise colorless and white-washed photo-shoot, I found a few of these breaks in the snow that created compositional tools in my pictures.

winter_2_by_starbirdsky-d77x4ht

When you are struggling to come up with a pleasant composition, try making a path in your picture. Lead the eye to just about anything and your pictures will come alive. I believe a great photograph can make the mundane, magnificent.

Happy Shooting,

Shawn Pagels

(artSEEguy)

 

 

Go Ahead, Get Your Feet Wet

Water is one of my favorite things to photograph, but like all things, to do it well you have to be willing to get a little uncomfortable. That means getting in! Being mindful of tides and the swiftness and depth of a river are real things you have to consider before jumping in. Keeping your camera secured around your neck is important too. Since my tripod is aluminum, I am not concerned with it rusting. The following are different examples of how I got wet to get my shot.

River:

Unless there are several places for your eye to bounce along, photographing a river from the the side on a bank or beach places a static band across your page and can create a boring image. There are exceptions, but in general this kind of side to side composition doesn’t intrigue the viewer. When facing this very problem down at one of my favorite parks, I decided to step in. I found a great big mossy rock in the middle of this stream and set up my camera on a tripod with my 11-16 Tokina wide angle lens.

upstream_by_starbirdsky-d6jvs6w

Upstream:

Never mistake good subject matter for a good photograph. With this next image, I struggled trying to get all the logs, foliage and flowing water to look as interesting as the idea of all these elements. I was shooting from a comfortable place along a bank and I was trying every angle I could, high, low, close and wide, but failed to capture an image that was worth keeping. Like my river shot, I decided to get in the water and try shooting from an angle that captured this scene downstream. The results were worth the extra five minutes removing my socks I think.

going_away_by_starbirdsky-d6k0nfq

Waterfalls:

This one you want to be extra cautious with. Waterfall areas will often have barriers and restricted areas that you want to stick to for your safety. The next image is from a very popular and heavily photographed waterfall in my city. There is a bridge spanning the outflow of this falls and good places to take a photograph. I wanted to try placing more water in the foreground of my image. I found a path that went under the bridge that brought my angle closer to what I wanted. I tried a few shots along the pebble beach but I wasn’t quite getting what I wanted. The water was shallow enough that day and I was able to step in and get just the right angle that included water and a few rocks in my final photograph.

august_at_whatcom_falls_by_starbirdsky-d6jvp6t

As always, make sure if you’re shooting wide not to let a leg of your tripod or remote cable get in the shot. Wear waterproof boots or go barefoot if you are certain it is safe to do so. Consider your angle and composition and try several exposures. Getting your feet wet can lead to some outstanding shots you wouldn’t achieve standing safely on dry land. With a little planning and caution, these small comfort risks will help your portfolio grow and shine.

Happy Shooting,

Shawn Pagels