Down To The Ground

As with most things in life, changing your perspective can make all the difference. Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes, as the proverbial advice suggests, broadens our understanding of the world around us. In photography, changing perspective is a powerful tool we can rely on to strengthen our artistic muscles.

After years of shooting pictures and art making, I still sometimes find myself walking around expecting pictures to make their way into my lens at my convenient, eye level, legs straight, non-tripod mounted,  lazy way of shooting pictures. Many times, simply pointing and shooting will suffice. Often times, you have no choice in the matter. You have to shoot when something presents itself. What I am referring to are those moments when the subject matter is fantastic, but for some reason you can not capture it’s essence. Those spectacular round river rock are white flecked, the water is hitting them midway, and you know it’s a lovely sight, but your pictures are dull and uninspiring. Or, there’s is a wonderful repetition in the way some boulders are placed in a pond, but for some reason the pictures you take are boring. My advice? Get down low.

Shooting from a lower perspective adds overlap , an important visual cue, to more elements in your photograph that you wouldn’t get otherwise. It also gives your images drama by placing more objects in the foreground, strengthening the depth of the image. It also allows for more compositional possibilities, and for me this really gets my creative juices flowing. Suddenly, I tiny leaf becomes a focal point and a major compositional anchor. A tiny piece of root directs the eye towards the focal point. A leafy twig springs up in the foreground providing a strong sense of space in your photograph.

Here are some examples of how I positioned my camera real low, sometimes a few inches, to the ground in order to capture the essence of my environment. Thanks for reading and keep in touch!

SpookyTree

 

peeka BooWeb

 

The Strength Of Solitude

Give your landscape and nature photographs more emotional potency by creating a narrative between a single subject and its environment.

 

Landscape photographers face a unique challenge in trying to simplify their images when there is an infinite amount of subject matter to try and compose in a single cohesive image. A great way to focus your pictures into well composed and poignant works of art is to establish a primary subject and capture the role your subject is playing in its surroundings.

to_the_rock_by_starbirdsky-d6k4aew

The single surfer in the water facing the large rock creates a story. In an image like this, it’s easy for the viewer to make an emotional connection by imagining him/herself as the surfer. This example works well because there is a human subject used, but the same principle can be applied to just about anything.

parked_seagull_by_starbirdsky-d75y1lr

I chose not to zoom in close on this seagull. Instead, I gave the bird plenty of room and placed him resting surrounded by plenty of sky. I prefer the feeling of a free bird over a caged bird and by giving the primary subject plenty of space to breathe, the desired feeling was conveyed in this photograph.

damsel_by_starbirdsky-d7854gv

A leafless little tree isn’t the first thing that pops in your head when you’re thinking of ideas for nature or landscape photography. Here I composed around a single leafless tree that is wedged in a coastal rock. By itself, the tree wouldn’t have given much of a narrative. However, shown here growing out of rough and lifeless rock, the viewer can see the persistence of life; a young tree starting life with a strong and solid foundation.

Challenge yourself to find these narratives. Having a story or an analogy in mind when shooting a photograph will make you grow as an artist. A technically sound photograph will always be admired, but the image that makes an emotional connection will be remembered.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels